Super Easy Use of BOTH, EITHER, NEITHER English

Super Easy Use of BOTH, EITHER, NEITHER English – Basically, both, either, and neither in English are used to talk about two things, both living and non-living things. However, each has a different meaning and use.

Super Easy Use of BOTH, EITHER, NEITHER English

Then what’s the difference? Let’s see right here!

BOTH

Both means “both” or two objects and means positive. Both can be used as a pronoun to refer to the two things mentioned earlier.

Both are always marked with a conjunction “and” (and) which is located between a noun or an adjective that describes the same idea in a sentence.

Example:

John has two children. Both are married.

(John has two children. Both are married.)

(Both = the two children)

The word “both” above explains the word “two children”. We can see from this sentence that John has two children and both of them are married.

Another example:

This project will take both time and money.

(This project will cost both time and money.)

Luna : Do you want the blue dress or the red one?

Alexa : I’ll buy both (= the blue dress and the red shirt = both shirts)

• Both + adjective + and + adjective

He’s both smart and diligent.

(He is smart and diligent.)

Smart = adjective

Diligent = adjective

• Both + noun + and + noun

She speaks both English and Japanese.

(He speaks both English and Japanese.)

English = noun

Japanese = noun

• Both + plural noun

If we want to put a noun after “both”, then the noun must be plural (plural).

Last year I went to Bali and Padang. Both cities are wonderful.

(Last year I went to Bali and Padang. Both cities were amazing.)

EITHER

Either means “one of the two”.

Either is used to express one of the two. Either is followed by an affirmative singular verb and is mostly used in negative questions or sentences.

Example:

Would you like tea or coffee? You can have either.

(Would you like tea or coffee? You can have both.)

(either = tea or coffee)

In the sentence above there is the word “either” which states one of “tea or coffee”

So, if we use either”, it means we are stating one of two things or things.

There were two pictures on the wall. I don’t like either.

In the sentence above there is a meaning that there are two pictures on the wall. Then the sentence “I don’t like either” implies that the speaker does not like either of the two paintings.

It means that between the two paintings the speaker only likes 1 painting and the other painting is not liked by the speaker.

Another example:

Either you or Felix has to finish the report before 4 pm.

(You or Felix must finish the report by 4pm.)

You can take either the red shirt or the blue shirt.

(You can take a red shirt or a blue shirt.)

• Either + singular noun

After “either” we can put a singular noun after it.

There are only two choices and I’m not interested in either film.

(There are only two options and I’m not interested in either of the films.)

A: Do you want to meet on Monday or Friday?

B: Either day is fine for me

(A: Would you like to meet on Monday or Friday?

B: Both are good for me.)

• Either of + plural noun

If we use “of” after “either”, then we can put a plural noun (plural noun) after it.

We’ve been dating for one year and I haven’t met either of her parents.

(We’ve been dating for 6 months and I haven’t met you with his parents)

I haven’t read either of these novels.

(I haven’t read any of these novels.)

NEITHER

Neither has the meaning of neither or neither.

Example:

Jacob: Do you want to go to the cinema or the concert?

(Do you want to go to a movie or a concert?)

Jo: Neither. I want to stay at home. (Not

none. I want to stay home.)

In the example above, Jacob asks Jo if she wants to go to a movie or a concert. Then Jo said “Neither” which meant he didn’t want to go to either of those places, he didn’t want to go to the movies or to a concert. So “neither” here means “none”.

Another example:

– Neither man wear suit.

This sentence states that there are two men and neither of them is wearing a suit.

– Neither John nor Frank likes doing the dishes.

(Neither John nor Frank like doing the dishes.)

– I want neither the red shirt nor the blue shirt.

(I don’t want a red shirt or a blue shirt.)

– He neither smokes nor drinks.

(He doesn’t smoke or drink alcohol.)

• Neither + singular noun

After “neither” we can put a singular noun after it.

– Neither team wanted to lose.

(No team wants to lose.)

– This tennis game was very close. Neither player was well-prepared.

(This tennis match is very close. Neither player is well-prepared.)

• Neither of + plural noun

If you use “of” after “neither”, then you can put a plural noun after it.

– Neither of my friends came to class today.

– Neither of the parents understood what the baby was trying to say.

(None of the parents understood what the baby was trying to say.)

Corrections:

Alexa: I’ll buy both (= the blue dress and the red dress = both dresses

Vital Records:

• Both…and… (“both” pairs with “and”)

Example:

He’s both handsome and cool.

(He’s handsome and cool)

• Either…or… (“either” pairs with “or”)

Example:

I will take either English or Japanese next semester.

(I will take English or Japanese next semester.)

• Neither…nor… (“neither” pairs with “nor”)

Example:

The book is neither interesting nor accurate.

(This book is uninteresting and inaccurate.)

Previously, I would like to discuss some parts in the “Either” section which are confusing as well as additional parts in the “Either” and “Neither” sections.

So, we know the meaning of “either” means “one of the two” or “one of the two”

Examples of using either:

Would you like tea or coffee? You can have either.

(Would you like tea or coffee? You can have one of the two)

(either = tea or coffee)

In the sentence above there is the word “either” which states one of “tea or coffee”

So, if we use either”, it means we are stating one of two things or things, in this case “tea” or “coffee”

Then there are additions and corrections for using either + singular nouns, especially in the examples section:

• Either + singular noun

There are only two choices and I’m not interested in either film.

(There are only two options and I’m not interested in either of them/both films)

In the next example:

A: Do you want to meet on Monday or Friday?

B: Either day is fine for me

(A: Would you like to meet on Monday or Friday?

B: Any day doesn’t matter to me)

Next up in either + plural nouns, especially in the examples section:

• Either of + plural noun

– We’ve been dating for one year and I haven’t met either of her parents.

(We have been dating for 6 months and I have never met any of his parents)

– I haven’t read either of these novels.

(I haven’t read any of these novels)

So, the conclusion:

“Either” means different / varies depending on the context of the sentence, either can mean:

– one of the two

– one

– anything/anywhere

Addition:

“Either” can also mean “also” in a negative context.

Examples of its use in sentences:

– She doesn’t like me and her sister doesn’t either.

(He doesn’t like me and neither does his sister)

– The smart phone has a decent specification and it’s not really expensive either.

(The smartphone has good specifications and the price is not expensive either)

– I’m not allowed to play outside so you can’t go either!

(I’m not allowed to play outside so you shouldn’t either!)

“Neither” can also mean “neither”

Examples of its use in sentences:

– My sister doesn’t like coffee and neither do I.

(My sister doesn’t like coffee and I don’t like it either)

– We didn’t win the game and neither did they.

(We didn’t win the game and neither did they)

– Gerry doesn’t want to go and neither does his girlfriend

(Gerry doesn’t want to go and his girlfriend doesn’t want to go either)

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